Riemann's Zeros and the Rhythm of the Primes A lecture by Dr. David Borthwick, Emory University

Date/Time: 
7 Feb 2012 - 5:00pm - 6:00pm

In 1859, Bernhard Riemann published a short paper called "On the Number of Primes Less Than a Given Magnitude." He speculated that the zeros of the zeta function all lie on a certain line in the complex plane. This conjecture, now called the Riemann Hypothesis, is universally regarded as the greatest unsolved problem in all of mathematics. This lecture will introduce the Hypothesis and try to explain why mathematicians find this arcane-sounding problem so compelling. We'll also explore some fascinating connections between Riemann zeros and quantum physics.

Dr. David Borthwick

David Borthwick, Ph.D. Professor, Emory University

Professor David Borthwick, spectral theorist and author of Spectral Theory of Infinite-Area Hyperbolic Surfaces (Birkhäuser, 2007), currently specializes in resonance counting problems. Although working as a mathematician, his Ph.D. is in physics and, when not doing math, he can frequently be found playing the viola or woodworking.

A pre-lecture reception with cookies, coffee and tea will be held at 4:30 PM in the General Academic Building, Room 472.

The RTG in Logic & Dynamics is a research training group supported by the National Science Foundation and the University of North Texas.

For more information on this event, contact the UNT Department of Mathematics at (940)565-2155, rtg@unt.edu, or visit www.math.unt.edu/rtg.

What
The RTG Logic and Dynamics Undergraduate Mathematics Research Colloquium Series presents... Riemann's Zeros and the Rhythm of the Primes A lecture by Dr. David Borthwick, Emory University "Riemann's Zeros and the Rhythm of the Primes", by Dr. David Borthwick, Emory University (RTG Logic & Dynamics Undergraduate Mathematics Research Colloquium Series)
Additional Information
Location: 
General Academic Building 105
State: 
Texas
Phone: 
(940)565-2155