Logistics Faculty Member Launches Research Project with One Network

Complex Logistics Systems research cluster

Dr. Wesley Randall, below, UNT assistant professor of logistics has launched a Theoretical Minimum-Demand Driven Supply Chain research project with a Dallas-based company, One Network Enterprises, Inc.   The research objective is to create a model that provides insight into the interrelationships between real-time visibility, demand driven supply chain management, the concept of theoretical minimums and three key supply chain levers (demand, supply, and lead time variability). 

This project will develop an evidence based research foundation that allows One Network and UNT to demonstrate to CEOs and supply chain executives how a demand driven supply chain approach, anchored around theoretical minimums, and supported by real time visibility provides new sources of supply chain cost efficiency.  The central pillar of this project is to show how a strategy that leverages theoretical minimums leads to cost savings and systemic performance improvement on the operational, tactical, and strategic fronts.

This effort was led by the Logistics research cluster but involved researchers outside Logistics who have organized themselves around common and complementary interests.

This effort was led by the Complex Logistics Systems research cluster but involved researchers outside Logistics who have organized themselves around common and complementary interests. Additional key UNT personnel include Dr. Shailesh Kulkarni, associate professor of information technology and decision sciences; Dr. David Nowicki, associate professor of logistics and Dr. Victor Prybutok, Regents Professor of information technology and decision sciences and associate dean of the Toulouse Graduate School.

UNT is nationally recognized as a hub of expertise in logistics and supply chain management, offering an exceptional base of faculty and professional resources, and comprehensive programs that incorporate leading edge research, technologies and practices across the entire field. Research performed by the Complex Logistics Systems cluster focuses on the process design, network optimization, and execution of freight and passenger flows from the source of supply to delivery with the end-user. The cluster leverages these strengths with partnerships in the public and private sectors to transform the complex, supply chains used to source and distribute goods on a global basis.