Research Profiles

Students to use research award to improve medical care

Ian Watt and Danielle Bryant
DENTON (UNT), Texas -- A University of North Texas student will collaborate with Children's Medical Center of Dallas to study why parents take their children to hospital emergency rooms instead of primary care doctors for non-urgent medical matters. And another UNT student will work with the university's Speech and Hearing Clinic to help people with hearing loss feel more comfortable using new...

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After 22 years with TAMS, Dean Richard Sinclair retires

Richard Sinclair
Under Dean Richard Sinclair's leadership, thousands of students have graduated from the Texas Academy of Mathematics and Science and have gone on to influence fields including medicine, engineering, law, technology and even the fine arts. Sinclair will retire at the end of the Spring 2014 semester, marking 22 years with TAMS and 37 years with UNT. Path to UNT Richard Sincliar, Dean of the Texas...

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TAMS student research covers broad range of topics

Natalie Wingfield and Vijay Vaidyanathan
Students enrolled in UNT's Texas Academy of Mathematics and Science, an early college entry program for advanced high school students, conduct research and gain experience in UNT's cutting-edge lab spaces, working on projects that span the sciences and have real-world impact. TAMS students develop medical technology, research alternative energy sources, investigate neurological conditions and...

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UNT conservation research spans the globe

UNT Assistant Professor of biology Jeff Johnson releases a peregrine falcon.
From investigating declining bumblebee populations to determining the effects of flooding and climate change on reptiles, UNT animal conservation research is making a difference around the world. UNT students have the opportunity to learn about conservation through the university's new Ecology for Environmental Science bachelor's degree program. The program is the only one of its kind in the...

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UNT experts help fight crime

In the sand-strewn battlefields of Afghanistan, military investigators will have a new tool to fight crime. A high-tech, portable workstation -- no bigger than a CD player -- will allow them to immediately identify the tiniest substances between the ridges of a fingerprint. Instead of sending samples to a sophisticated off-site lab, investigators can manipulate them on the nano-scale with mass...

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